vendredi 30 décembre 2011

How to become a Better Person: Think with your Heart


I have noticed, as I learn more about comparative philosophies that at a deeper level they tend to merge. There are no competition involved here, it is said in their particular context and form.
Today I read once again what Lame Deer, a Lakota had said.
"What you see with your eyes shut is what counts."
-- Lame Deer, LAKOTA
Another whole world opens up when we close our eyes and calm our mind. Be still and know; be still and hear; be still and see; be still and feel. Inside every person is a still, small voice. Sometimes it is necessary to close our eyes to shut down our perception in order to see. Try this occasionally when you are talking to your child or spouse, close your eyes and listen to them. Listen to the tone of their voice; listen to their excitement; listen to their pain-listen.

(The commentary is from White Bison)


Immediately what comes to your mind?
The Little Prince.
Voici mon secret. Il est très simple: on ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux.
§  Here is my secret. It is very simple: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.
§  Variants: "Here is my secret. It is very simple: one sees well only with the heart. The essential is invisible to the eyes."
"The essential things in life are seen not with the eyes, but with the heart."
"One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes."

The above words have been with me ever since I read it during an adolescent afternoon. I would like to thank the person who gave me that book as a gift. A gift that multiplies itself.
Always one can look up to Dalai Lama and his words are those of a human being, not a religious person or monk but one who practises kindness and compassion.
“This is my simple religion. No need for temples. No need for complicated philosophy. Your own mind, your own heart is the temple. Your philosophy is simple kindness.” 
 Dalai Lama XIV

I am happy to read some philosophy whether it is North American Indian or European or Vedic or Buddhist. It gives me a lift. Each day to add to the feeling of being Grateful
A single breath escapes and it whispers
I want to be a better person…

FROM PICO IYER  BUSINESS WEEK DEC 20 2011 Dalai Lama in Japan

When the Dalai Lama stepped out of his car to greet and console the hundreds who had gathered in the street to see him, women began wailing and sobbing, “Thank you, thank you.”
He told them to look forward, not back; to honor the dead with something more concrete than tears; to rebuild their community as their nation had so stirringly rebuilt itself in the wake of World War II. As he turned round, however, I noticed that the usually unshakable Tibetan was wiping a tear from his eye.